Monday, May 14, 2018

Computer Archeology

I had my DNA sequenced by 23 and Me a while back, and I was surprised to get a couple of messages from a 2nd cousin and a possible 4th cousin.

This led me to trying to find a printout of a family tree that my brother had compiled some time before he died in June 2005.  Unfortunately, I couldn't find the printout, but I found something better:  a 3.5" floppy with the family data.  That's when I discovered that my 3.5" floppy drive (yes, I still have one) had died.   That sent me on a scavenger hunt at work, trying to locate a portable drive that I could borrow.  I struck pay-dirt with my supervisor, who knew of a couple of 3.5" USB floppy drives that LAN Services used to use for flashing updates.

It took a bit of coaxing to get my Windows 10 computer to recognize the drive, and then I was further stymied by the data.  The disk had a single data file:  Olynyk.FTW.   The FTW file extension was something used by Family Tree Maker.   But then, things got crazy complicated.

First, Family Tree Maker software costs something on the order of $80.  Then, it was a matter of the FTW file being in a very old, circa 2004 data format.

Fortunately, I was able to locate a free, downloadable installation file for Family Tree Maker version 4.0 for Windows 95 (May 15, 1997).  I have a copy of VMWorkstation on my work PC, so I first tried installing Windows 95 on it from an ISO image.   This was a non-trivial task, because in order to install the Windows ISO I first had to have an image file of a bootable DOS disk.


When I finally got Windows 95 installed, I was further hamstrung with various incompatibilities.  The USB drivers were not native to Windows 95, and connecting to the Internet with Windows 95 was a real bear.   I finally gave up on Windows 95 and installed a Windows 98 virtual machine.   That allowed me access to the  the internet.  I still had trouble with the USB floppy drive, but I burned the data file to a CD (talk about a waste of space!), which worked with Windows 98.



I loaded and installed the ancient version of Family Tree Maker, read in the Olynyk.FTW data file and then exported it to a more portable GEDCOM format.  With internet access, I was able to log into FileLocker.wvu.edu and upload the data file.



With that data, I was able to use a free Family Tree Builder program that runs on Windows 10.

I've been working with computers for 35 years, but I didn't appreciate until now how evanescent old data formats could be. 

I guess anything I have on old computer tape is pretty much lost forever.  And thank goodness that I don't have anything left on punch cards!

Post Script:  Success!

I can't leave well enough alone.  I re-installed Windows 95 and got the internet thing.


Big surprise:  IE 3.0 has a bitch of a time resolving web pages -- even Microsoft's.

Friday, May 11, 2018

Way Up North

This is the first time ever that I spotted a double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) north of the Florida gulf coast. 


This isn't a great picture of one.  It's just swimming and diving around in the Monongahela river near the Decker's creek confluence.  It has the prettiest color eyes.



According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology site, this bird is well within its migratory range.  It looks like it breeds in Canada, so this one is likely just passing through.

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Trillium signs the likes of which even god has not seen

I had seen this stand of white trilliums (Trillium grandiflorum) from along the highway for a couple of years now.  Yesterday, I decided to brave the traffic and hauled my camera and tripod out to capture these.


Granted, the landscape leaves a lot to be desired, but I tried to convey the sheer number of these flowers.  Here's a more up-close shot:


According to one web site, Trilliums spread very slowly by underground root stocks, and the seed produced creates new plants even more slowly. From a planted seed, it takes approximately five to nine years for a Trillium grandiflorum plant to bloom. So when you see a massive drift of these in spring, you know you're looking at a bunch of plants that are at least a decade old, probably much older.

Obviously, this stand has been lumbered (at the least), but it's nice to see that such a large growth of Trilliums have escaped the bulldozer.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Cheap Frills

The bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) is said to be quite variable in flower and leaf.  I shot this one in the Arboretum last Saturday, where it is shown displaying its frill in a threatening manner.


Although this type of behavior is typical of certain animals, it's not at all common in the plant kingdom.


The juice of the bloodroot is red and poisonous, but at least it doesn't spit.  The other plants nearby nonetheless felt threatened.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Spring in the Arboretum

Took a stroll down the rail trail to the bottom of the WVU Arboretum last Saturday.  The highly variable weather we've been having has had a strange effect on the wildflowers there.  I went for the Bluebells, but they weren't anything like what they've been in previous years.

Here's a panorama shot, facing up hill.


What was impressive was the volume of plants like Trout Lily and Wakerobin.



I learned something new about the Wakerobin.  There are a couple of closely related species of it.  I've always thought that this is the red trillium or wakerobin (Trillium erectum), but now I've leaned that this might also be a furrowed wakerobin (Trillium sulcatum), which is more southern and also grows in this state (W.Va.). Although quite similar, you can tell them apart by the smell: Trillium erectum smells like rotten meat and Trillium sulcatum smells faintly musty, like fresh fungus. Sorry to say, but I did not think to smell this.

Monday, March 26, 2018

A tale of two shots

I took some time off from work last Thursday and made a brief trip up to Desker's Creek in Preston County.  There was still a good bit of snow on the ground, and I didn't exactly come prepared to do what I did, which was to work my way down into a ravine that held a torrent of icy water.

Not knowing what I'd do next, I fired off a bunch of shots with my camera.  This one has certain aesthetic elements, as I composed it for all of the triangles in the picture:  the fallen tree, the path of the water, the sky, etc.


You can follow certain rules of composition and make the best out of a sow's ear, but this picture is still a sow's ear.  It's too busy.  The snow-covered tree is interesting, but there's just too much going on here.

I mustered the courage to climb up and go back down a little further up stream.  I crawled onto a boulder and took this next shot.


This one doesn't scream "winter" like the other one.  You have to look carefully to notice the snow.  And the composition is pretty straightforward here:  law of thirds, with the top of the falls and the bottom of the falls taking up the middle third.

Still, this picture is way nicer than the previous shot.  It's the one that made it worth falling on my ass for.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

...And the flag was still there!

The fourth nor'easter in three weeks was hitting Morgantown this morning.


This is a shot from the 7th floor of One Waterfront Place.

Monday, March 19, 2018

Forward, From the Rear

I had to deliver some papers to the Law Clinic at noon today, so I took my camera along for the ride.
The back of the Law School overlooks Ruby Hospital and the football stadium, but the view was far from grand.  Ronald McDonald house takes up the lower-right portion of the picture.


The light gray building above and to the left of the hospital is the old hospital, which has been converted to a life sciences building.  The white building to the right of the hospital belongs to NIOSH.

If only I could have risen about six feet, I could have been clear the the McHouse.

Monday, March 12, 2018

Morgantown from Atop

Saturday proved to be beautiful day, but I hardly had the chance to get out and shoot any pictures.
I did manage to get this panorama of Morgantown, as seen from the University Towne Center behind the Sams Club.


Colors are still drab.  This picture doesn't have a lot going for it, but it provides a nice view of the Coliseum and the Evansdale campus.  It's a BIG valley in this shot.

Here's a closer view that I like better:



Colors are a little wonky, but I like the play of light and shadows on the various campus buildings.  Besides the obvious coliseum, you've got Ruby Memorial Hospital behind that, and the Towers complex on the right.   Behind the Towers, you can make out Puskar Stadium.

Friday, March 9, 2018

Canadian Nationalism

While photographing a Canada goose, I got down low on a rise and shot up.   The results remind me of nationalistic art.

Here it is, goose-stepping:


And here it is in a heroic art pose:


Thursday, March 8, 2018

Stranger in a Strange Land

Last night was one of those rare occasions where I possessed a semblance of a normal life.  Wife and I went to see Foreigner at the Creative Arts Center with a friend.


I don't think anyone from original band was there, but you'd never know if from the sound.  No sign of founding member Mick Jones in last night's lineup.

Front row:  The guy on the far left is Bruce Watson.  Next is Tom Gimbel, master of guitar, flute, saxaphone and keyboards.  The new lead singer is Kelly Hansen, who is a fitting substitute for Lou Gramm.  On the bass is Jeff Pilson.
In the back, on keyboard, is Mike Bluestein, and on drums is Chris Frazier.

After the band returned for an encore, they brought on a chorus of kids (don't know if high school or college) to accompany them on "I Want to Know What Love Is."   That was probably my favorite song, although I've been known to bastardize the lyrics to it.

I want to know what love is.  I want you to blow me.

Monday, March 5, 2018

Look Closer

Late February was not particularly conducive to photography.  There's just not much going on.
While walking down the rail trail toward town the other day, I snapped a picture of some Sycamore tree seed heads.   As you can see, there's not much there, and the river was a crappy shade of muddy.

The one thing that caught my eye was the grouping of seed heads in the middle of the shot.   They reminded me of musical notes.

A little bit of cropping, and I have something a lot more interesting than the original picture:

Still not the prettiest thing, but a whole lot better than the way it started.